Tag Archives: However/therefore

Comprehension for The Cook (Chapter 2) Joining ideas

Look again at Chapter 2 of The Cook and answer the following questions.

A. First, look at this example of ‘however’ in i. below. As you can see, its meaning is not very different from ‘but’.

i. The book was expensive; however, I decided to buy it.

There are three  other ways of writing these ideas:

ii. The book was expensive. I decided to buy it.

iii. The book was expensive, but I decided to buy it.

(iv. The book was expensive. But I decided to buy it.)

The last sentence is used informally. You can see many examples of it in fiction. Look at i. and iii. above. How is the punctuation different?

B. Now look at this example of ‘therefore’ in v. below. As you can see, its meaning is not very different from ‘so’.

v. I had no money; therefore, I couldn’t buy the book.

There are three other ways to write these ideas:

vi. I had no money. I couldn’t buy the book.

vii. I had no money, so I couldn’t buy the book.

(viii. I had no money. So I couldn’t buy the book.)

The last sentence is used informally. You can see many examples of it in fiction. Again, look at the punctuation for v. and viii. How are they different?

C. Now choose either ‘however’ or ‘therefore’ to complete these sentences about The Cook (Chapter 2)

1. Candy found some money; (therefore/however), she was able to call the school.

2. Candy was tired; (therefore/however), she didn’t stop walking.

3. Few people wanted to help Candy; (therefore/however), it took her a long time to get to the school.

4. Along the way, she passed a Fish and Chip shop; (therefore/however), it wasn’t busy because lunchtime was over.

5. The man who spoke to Candy already knew her name; (therefore/however), she didn’t need to tell him.

Tagged , ,